God, Sex, Christopher West, How far can you go?

We have forgotten who we are!

Christian (you!) recognise your DIGNITY! The moral life is about recognising our greatness; recognising WHO WE REALLY ARE as men and women, waking up from that amnesia … we’re all hungry for love and the moral life is about not settling for counterfeit love! where do we go to feed that hunger? The culture has a fast food menu, the culture says, come bring your hunger here and we’ll give you  all this greasy fast food, immediate pleasure, immediate gratification, fine, but what happens when we eat that fast food? it clogs our arteries, we get sick. The truth of the Church is confirmed in the wounds of the culture that rejects it (ouch ouch ouch!!).

What are the wounds?

What is at stake is the truth of love, our humanity, the core of the Gospel, the call to love in the image and likeness of God: LOVE ONE ANOTHER AS I HAVE LOVED YOU

Watching YouTube

My elder sister sent me these to watch  ………

The life of little St. Therese of Lisieux, depicted in minimalist vignettes. Therese and her sisters are all nuns in a Carmelite convent. Her devotion to Jesus and her concept of “the little way” to God are shown clearly, using plain modern language. A sense of angelic simplicity comes across without fancy lights, choirs, or showy miracles.

This intimate, intense little film shows the making of a saint `from the outside.’ When I first saw it, I was so impressed by the portrait of young Therese Martin that I learned all I could about the icon she became to the Roman Catholic World.

The after-death publication of her stubby-pencil autobiography “The Story of a Soul” captured the attention of the devout. She rapidly came to be known as `The Little Flower’ or “St. Therese of Lisieux” and was canonized in 1927, becoming co-patroness of France with St. Joan of Arc, and a “doctor of the church”.

The film shows us this giant figure of the faith as she appeared within the hermitically sealed world of a Carmelite convent-a little girl with quietly extraordinary qualities. No music or heavenly light announces her holiness. The scenes are barren, the light is directional and shadowed, as in a Caravaggio painting.

The film presents a series of vignettes, as though on as shallow stage. Within each one, she seems to seek to hide, not allowing herself to dramatize even her own illness and approaching death. But the reactions of other sisters reveal her.

An elderly nun chooses her as confessor, surrendering to her the one private possession she has retained, against the rules, for 50 years. A confused and unhappy young sister responds to her clear-eyed and loving compassion.

A crabby older sister showers her with flowers and asks her for the relic of a fingernail clipping, astonished that she is unable to withhold her homage.

Most important, her Mother Superior, who alone knows her secret desire to become a great saint, requires that she write down the thoughts of her heart, knowing that they will be important.

Believers will be moved, the merely curious may find themselves breathless.

Ash Wednesday

I have followed this tradition for years so about time to understand well where it came from and its significance …


Although Ash Wednesday is not a Catholic holy day of obligation, it is an important part of the season of Lent. The first clear evidence of Ash Wednesday is around 960, and in the 12th century people began using palm branches from the previous Palm Sunday for ashes.

Teaching of St. Theresa of Lisieux on Purgatory

God is Father rather than Judge.

For St. Therese God was more Father than Judge, and she took the liberty of finally responding, “My sister, if you look for the justice of God you will get it. The soul will receive from God exactly what she desires.”