Beyond environment: falling back in love with Mother Earth by Jo Confino

Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh explains why mindfulness and a spiritual revolution rather than economics is needed to protect nature and limit climate change.

 

“Fear, separation, hate and anger come from the wrong view that you and the earth are two separate entities, the Earth is only the environment. You are in the centre and you want to do something for the Earth in order for you to survive. That is a dualistic way of seeing.

“So to breathe in and be aware of your body and look deeply into it and realise you are the Earth and your consciousness is also the consciousness of the earth. Not to cut the tree not to pollute the water, that is not enough.”

HOME: the wonderment of our world

http://www.youtube.com/homeproject#p/a/f/0/jqxENMKaeCU

Kolin Lymworth “This very beautiful film brings home the astonishing speed with which our industrial growth society is devastating Creation. Our comfort, convenience and security have come at a crippling cost to the Great Tree upon which we humans bloom. If we look at the living world as a whole, the extinction rate is now 1,000 times faster than we would naturally expect. It’s caused by a single species. Somewhere in our soul, we know we are tearing apart the fabric of Eden which took 4 billion years (about a million and a half generations) to develop flowering plants, trees, and homo sapiens, “wise humans.”  Let us remember:  we have a depthless ineradicable mutual belonging to the Universe–from the beginning. Something in us knows and feels this increasing pollution and extinction in Creation as a spiritual emergency in our time. Here we are.

The poet Antonio Machado said, “I wept. I said to my soul, ‘What have you done with the Garden entrusted to you?’
Our nuclear wastes—which Joanna Macy calls “the poison fire,” will be toxic to life for a million years. The consequences of our short-sighted ways are endangering all life on Earth. Knowing this is a powerful call to a new kind of consciousness for us humans. It calls forth the mender, the healer, the visionary, the re-builder, the designer, the gardener…  While tragically “civilizing” the indigenous cultures who knew how to live in sustainable harmony with the local and flowering earth, we industrious moderns have scrambled our bearings, seemingly cut off from Nature and so often from each other. We’ve misplaced our soul somewhere in the mall, consumed by and entangled with “stuff”—and we’re armed with the weapons of fear.”